Understaying Your Welcome

nomadicShe shoved her wadded up sweats and t-shirt into her duffle bag. Down in the yard, a blue jay dove on a squirrel. Hand still in the bag, she imagined a mother bird risking all to protect her young. She’d never know the feeling.

The rest of the house was silent. These big wooden houses, if someone was moving you’d hear it. Sounds carried through the registers in the floor and up wide staircases, down spacious hallways to the small room in the tower at the front of the house.

They’d had a nice dinner at a picnic table in the backyard, her hostess and her 5 boys. Their dad was working late; he wouldn’t be home until after they’d all gone to bed. And now she was leaving before he was up.

She was more comfortable with men, so last night she’d chatted more with the boys than with their mother. The woman kept eyeing her oldest boy, a young man, really. … more … “Understaying Your Welcome”

My fiction newsletter signup — the official handwritten welcome note

Every person who signs up for my newsletter gets a personal welcome. Some, it’s just that: a welcome. Others, it’s an excerpt from something I’ve written. Most, though, get a vignette I compose on the spot.

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Reviewing them just now, I realized I could rearrange them to make sense as the introduction of a story. Almost.

Like this:

… more … “My fiction newsletter signup — the official handwritten welcome note”

Wedding Day

He’d said he’d leave his old life, settle down, marry her. She wanted to believe him, wanted to be his wife.

It had taken time. He’d said it over and over. As they walked in the meadow at the edge of town. As they sat by the fire at Mrs. Wilson’s cafe on damp days. As he’d walked her almost all the way home.

She’d finally believed that he’d changed, that she could marry him and be happy.

Her pa was another matter.

“Men like him don’t change, Lacey.”

“You did.” She didn’t make it a habit to challenge him, but since her mother’s death she’d grown bolder. Her pa pretended not to notice, just went on as if she hadn’t changed.

“I was never like him. And you’ll never marry him, I’ll see to that.”

She had wondered why her pa could change but wouldn’t allow it in another man.

And now, standing at the front of the little church where the town nearly spilled into the meadow, she wondered where he was; where they both were.

# # #

Meanwhile deep in the woods, two men stood, guns drawn, in a level place at the edge of the stream.

Their guns were not aimed at each other.

at the edge of the stream

Simplicity Itself (Revisited)

It’s been a couple years since I posted my very first short story (vignette, actually) here: Simplicity Itself.

I wrote it on my first computer, which would have been about 1990. Long before the days of the web. (A computer with no hard drive. Just two 5 1/4″ floppies.)

As soon as it was done, another sentence popped into my head:

It was one of those days when breakfast wanted to be cheap whiskey straight from the bottle.

And we know what that led to, don’t we?

Probably time for Simplicity Itself to turn into the book it never was.

Question is, will it be Phil Brennan’s book, or some completely new character?