Stephen King’s Yellow Card Man 11.22.63

I’ve stayed up past midnight 3 nights in a row to finish Stephen King’s 11.22.63. Yes, it’s that good (and that long; nearly 900 pages.)

Not a fan of horror, but this one is fantasy/scifi rather than his usual genre. It has time travel. It’s a historical novel. It has romance. In the end notes it has a nod to Time and Again which I agree with King is the best time travel book written.

One small but vital character interested me because of a parallel to Jake Calcutta and the Temporal Lisle. It seems guardians of time travel are a common idea. I’m giving a little away here, but you can’t read the first few chapters of King’s book and not realize that the yellow card man is going to be more than a bit player, no matter how few lines he speaks.

So there you have it: Stephen King is starting to write like me because we like the same time travel book.

(Speaking of fantasy . . . )

Rafe Keyn and the Temporal Lisle, Chapter 1

No, I’m not publishing the whole thing here. Not this time. But y’all may as well read a sample chapter and tell me whether you’re awaiting it with bated breath so I can hurry and finish it up.

broken-timeI’m a Fixer, a keeper of the Temporal Lisle, the thread that, literally, holds time together.

It was how Rafe Keyn could have introduced himself to anyone he met. He never would, of course. The Fixers, or more properly Deputies of the Agency for Prevention of Historically Anomalous Events, or APHAE, were the Agency’s most guarded secret.

The only secret guarded more closely was the existence of the Temporal Lisle itself, but that couldn’t rightly be said to be their secret; it was simply the way the universe was bound together.

Time, the founders of APHAE had learned, was not the abstract concept commoners held it to be. It was, in fact, a physical construct, a real and literal thing which could be seen, observed, touched. … more … “Rafe Keyn and the Temporal Lisle, Chapter 1”