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Limited Time Offer: Pre-Order A Long Hard Look and Read the Unedited Version Right Now

I'll be posting a new chapter of A Long Hard Look on the blog every day until it's all online. If you'd like to continue reading the story absolutely free, that's super. If you'd prefer not to wait, here's how it works: A Long Hard Look
  1. Pre-order the book for $10. You'll get the print and digital versions, shipped anywhere in the US, when they're finished. (Ask me about international shipping cost.)
  2. I'll email you the unedited draft of the entire book right away. It won't be polished and pretty, but you'll get the whole story, just as it will appear here on the site.
Once the final chapter goes live here on my site, this special price ends, and the first draft will no longer be offered.

Through the Fog

Through the Fog

An amnesiac is pursued through the wilds of west Ireland accompanied by a beautiful woman who may or may not be his friend. As flickers of memory return they only add to his confusion.

A light mystery that’s more about people than puzzles. Includes 50 black & white photographs by the author.

(The photos were taken during our stay in Ireland. Though they're not directly related to the story, they're a fun addition that helps put you in the scene.)

Order Yours Now

You can order the paperback direct from me right there below, or if you'd prefer to order from Amazon just follow that link. Or get the Kindle version and be reading in minutes!

$13

in the US

$18

outside the US

Order the Kindle version for only $3.99

Order the paperback direct from the author

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Readers' Comments

Mystery for the end of Summer

This mystery had me hooked from the beginning. I really enjoyed the light sense of humor woven throughout. The locale descriptions put me right in the Irish countryside and drinking a pint or two along with the characters. This is a perfect "end of Summer" read.

—Kari Hagensmith

Delightful For More Than One Reason

Reason 1: It has an unexpected rhythm that sometimes borders on poetic while giving a nod to film noir. Different from anything I've read lately.

Reason 2: It has suspense, humor, and even a love interest and can still be read by every member of the family, and everyone enjoy it! (Have you seen what teens are reading these days?)

Reason 3: You, start of with your mind working against you; "Why did he do that", "Why did he say that?", "Where did That come from?". As you continue reading you just let your mind relax and enjoy the ride. By the end you're completely engrossed and wanting more!

Reason 4:It's a compact read (185 pages that is perfect for a long weekend.

I gave it 4 stars because it's lacking a sequel!

—Ceci Pagan

Irish thriller!

Fast-paced story, narrated with style, panache and wit. And lots of beautiful scenery and wonderful descriptions of all things Irish. I recommend enjoying it with some Guinness at reach - you will feel right there in the middle of the action.

—Marcos Gaser

Just the right amount of fog

I have to admit the mysterious beginning wasn't hooking me fully. Just enough to keep reading ... and, thank goodness! A lively, wonderful romp with bad guys and a beautiful woman who might be a bad guy only we're not sure, and an amnesiac who might be his own version of a bad guy but we're cautiously rooting for him, not quite sure which way things are going to go.

This is a perfect holiday read because you will want to hunker down and just read and read, following the twists and turns in the road and the twists and turns in the plot.

—Caitlyn James

Excerpts

Page 1

I looked up at the two pairs of dress shoes, and I wondered.

The grime on the window made it difficult to tell for certain, but they looked like dress shoes; both pairs. The harsh glare of the summer sun made their shine difficult to look at, even through the aforementioned grime.

The feet shuffled; one pair, anyway, and one of them spoke. "Another not at home; looks like it's gonna be a long morning." Another voice said "The others don't look vacant, at least."

The feet turned and walked away, and I looked down at my own. More dress shoes. They were on an upside down plastic crate, the ones that say something about being the property of such-and-such a dairy and you're not supposed to keep them but everyone does.

The window was up high, which is why I was on the carton. The window was in a basement, which is why I was looking up at someone else's shoes; or had been, at least.

Turning my head slowly, I considered what I could see without moving: a furnace and the appurtenant ductwork; a neat stack of cardboard boxes, all the same size; a bicycle with one flat tire and one wheel entirely missing; a grubby mattress, half against the wall, half on the floor; various other basement-y things that didn't seem to surprise me.

I listened. Hard. Through the window (or so it seemed) came the infrequent sounds of a Los Angeles summer. A car drove by. Footsteps across the street (my visitors, perhaps?) An enormous flying bug of some kind buzzing against the window, then buzzing away.

But nothing that sounded human, other than the footsteps, and now they were quiet. And no sounds of any kind from above me, inside the house. I decided to risk stepping down off the crate. Not a smart move, but that's me sometimes.


Buick Roadmaster

The car was indeed just around the corner. It was also big enough to make Dope and Pally feel right at home: a deep green 1957 Buick Roadmaster. Must have been 20 feet long and half that wide. Three linebackers could sip tea in the back seat without joggling anyone's cucumber sandwiches off their lap.

"It's a sight, ain't it? Should've seen it when the boss bought it: pink and white. Yah, pink, can you imagine? Kelly green really sets off all them acres of chromium, eh?" I was in the process of missing the chromium, being shoved into the back seat about as gently as the birth of a giraffe. Pally got in beside me, and contrary to his film noir style, did not pull a gun out of his pocket. Having taken a mental inventory of my own musculature, I figured he was still safe.